How can I steer my vehicle safely?

You can also test your position and proper reach and handling of your steering wheels when you can rest your wrists on top of the steering wheels without having to lean over. This way you can easily turn your steering wheels on sharp turns without having to lean over or overextend your arms. 

holding steering wheels correctly

Imagine your steering wheels as a clock. Hold your steering wheels at the 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock position and you should be able to make sharp turns comfortably with your arms having some bend in them and are not fully extended during sharp turns.

You also need to be able to reach the pedals without having to extend your legs completely. You need to have some bend in your legs so you can comfortably reach the pedals.

How do I steer my vehicle in general?
Picture your steering wheel as a clock – the best practice is to hold it in either of the following positions:

  • Left hand at 8 o'clock and right hand at 4  o'clock position
  • Left hand at 9 o'clock and right hand at 3  o'clock position

Here are the best steering techniques:

1. Push-Pull Steering Technique
The push-pull method is a recommended way to make safer and smoother turns. It also allows for keeping both hands on the steering wheel during the turn.

(a) How do I make a left turn?

  1. Start with your hands positioned at 8 and 4 o'clock.
  2. Pull down with your left hand (from 8 o'clock to approximately 7 o'clock).
  3. Push up with your right hand (from 4 o'clock to approximately 1 o'clock).
  4. Repeat the steps to complete your turn.
  5. Counter-steer to go straight.

(b) How do I make a right turn?

  1. Start with your hands positioned at 8 and 4 o'clock.
  2. Pull down with your right hand (from 4 o'clock to approximately 5 o'clock).
  3. Push up with your left hand (from 8 o'clock to approximately 11 o'clock).
  4. Repeat the steps to complete your turn.
  5. Counter-steer to go straight.

2. Hand-over-Hand Steering Technique The Hand-over-Hand Steering method provides the ability to make quicker turns, but it should only be used when turning at low speed or to make an emergency turn. Here are some of the uses of the Hand-over-Hand steering method:

  • Making a sharp right turn
  • Making a U-turn
  • Parking
  • Correcting out of a skid

The name explains itself, as you turn, your hands are going to cross each other. Here are the steps for turning using Hand-over-Hand Steering:

Start with your hands positioned at 9 and 3 o'clock, and then:

(a) To turn right:
Your left hand will grab the steering wheel at 9 o'clock and turn it clockwise to approximately 2 o'clock, then your right hand will cross over your left hand and grab at around 10 o'clock and continue turning and repeat the pattern.

(b) To turn left:
Your left hand will grab the steering wheel at 3 o'clock and turn it counter-clockwise to approximately 10 o'clock, then your left hand will cross over your right hand and grab at around 2 o'clock and continue turning and repeat the pattern.

To go straight, just reverse the movements.

3. One-Hand Steering Technique
The name explains itself. The driver uses only one hand to steer. This method is only used:

  • Backing up when you do not need to make a full left or right turn.
  • When you need to use your other hand for changing gears or using another vehicle control.