Guide Signs

Guide signs provide information about the roads and highways, and distance and directions to destinations.

Guide signs are square or rectangular-shaped and are green or brown with white lettering.

Below are some of the most common guide signs:
interstate route sign

Interstate Highway Sign
Tells you the name of the interstate highway that you are driving on, which is a number.
Interstate Highways (also called Freeways or Expressways) connect major cities of different states.
Interstate Highways have designed to have controlled access meaning that you can only access them through the highway's onramp and you are not permitted to ride a bicycle or walk on Interstate Highways.

US Route Sign

US Route Sign
Tells you the name of the US highway that you are driving on, which is a number.
US highways connect major cities of different states, but unlike Interstate Highways, US highways are older and have not been designed based on controlled access.

County Route Sign

County Route Sign
Tells you the name of the county road that you are driving on, which is a number.
County roads are usually older and are maintained by the county rather than Federal or State government. Due to limited budget of most counties, those types of roads are less maintained therefore, they can be less safe than Interstate Highways or US highways.

freeway-destination guide sign

Destination Distance Sign
Tells you about how many miles is left to reach the next few exits' destination road names, major cities, or a major destination.

freeway guide sign exit

Interstate Highway (Freeway / Expressway) exit sign
Tells you the exit number and/or the name of the main roadway that the highway off-ramp will be connecting to.
(Most freeway's exit signs have exit numbers. California was the only state that did not use exit numbering system; however, starting from 2002, California begin to include exit numbers on its freeways.)